Mini Cooper SE Electric First Drive Highlights Lowlights

first_img World Debut: Mini Electric Concept Live At Frankfurt Motor Show Check Out These New Spy Shots Of Mini Electric Mule The upcoming Mini Electric may be a solid offering for urban families … as a second car.About ten years ago, BMW made a handful of battery-electric Mini Coopers. They were expensive (lease only), and the battery pack took up rear seat space and cargo room, but people leased every last one of them and there was demand for more. Fast-forward to the present and Mini is back at it. In fact, the automaker has been working on the new Mini Electric for some time. As previously reported, packaging the battery in such a small car has proven difficult, but not quite as much of an issue as it was in the past.The all-new, two-door, four-seat Mini EV is due to launch by the end of 2019. Autoblog enjoyed a welcome opportunity to take the Mini Cooper SE electric prototype for a spin at an off-road driving event in Munich. The publication admits it can’t say too much about the car yet, since BMW isn’t advertising the vehicle this early on. Nonetheless, let’s dive into what the publication has to share.More Mini Electric Coverage: Source: Electric Vehicle News BMW i1 Reportedly In The Works, Will Share Mini Electric Platform Low on rangeThe upcoming Mini features a 33-kWh battery pack and a 135 kW motor. It will offer a range of about 120 miles on a charge. DC fast-charging will get you about an 80 percent charge in 40 minutes. BMW will market it as an urban car for families that may use it as a second or third vehicle. Overall, it’s at least loosely based on the BMW i3. According to Mini, it will be priced competitively when compared to the Cooper S with an automatic transmission. So, how does it drive?Autoblog says the Mini offers the instant torque that you expect from an electric car, and there’s no wheelspin due to its advanced traction control system. It features regenerative braking that can’t be switched off by the driver. It handles and steers much like any Mini and, as expected, there’s minimal body roll. While the Mini Electric is heavier than a traditional Cooper, it does a respectable job of keeping the ride smooth. However, the review points out:There is a weird, slightly laggardly response to the wheel, however. Once the nose has started to yaw, the front wants to push wide. At this point the Mini requires all the formidable grip from its 205/45/R17 Pirelli P Zero tires to keep to the prescribed line.In the end, the publication asserts that this car could probably not be a family’s only vehicle. But, those that live in the city and have another vehicle may find it a welcome addition to the stable. It’s quick, nimble, fun to drive, and offers a decent enough range for local trips and most commutes.To read the review in its entirety, follow the source link below.Source: Autoblog Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Calamity for Cech as Nihat works Turkeys miracle

first_imgShare on WhatsApp Calamity for Cech as Nihat works Turkey’s miracle Group A @DaveHytner Share on Facebook Euro 2008 David Hytner at Stade de Genève Sun 15 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Topics The adrenaline, the overwhelming sense of joy and achievement, will be coursing through the veins of Nihat Kahveci this morning. The sensations will be similar for each and every one of this remarkable Turkey squad, who never know when they are beaten, and it will be present and correct in all of their supporters, for whom the party will go on and on – certainly until they face Croatia in the quarter-finals of the European Championship on Friday.The quarter-finals of the European Championship – the concept seemed outlandish here in the west of Switzerland as they trailed to the Czech Republic. They ought to have been further behind at half-time than just the one goal, scored by Jan Koller, such was their opponents’ dominance, and in spite of a much improved start to the second half all hope appeared lost when Jaroslav Plasil put the Czechs further in front.Fatih Terim, the Turkey manager, had already thrown caution to the wind. Having retweaked his formation at half-time, he sent on Colin Kazim-Richards, another offensive player, and went for broke. More than half of his line-up took up attacking positions. Sabri Sarioglu, the substitute, and Hamit Altintop, nominally the right-back, both played like inside forwards.Plasil’s goal, converted at the far post, seemed sure to bring Terim’s men to their knees but they absorbed the body blow and went again. The coach later said that, if Turkey were going to lose, it might as well have been by four goals as two, and they thrived on the strange sense of liberation. Jan Polak hit the post for the Czechs but after Arda Turan had reduced the arrears, squeezing a shot inside Petr Cech’s post from Altintop’s cut-back, the scene was set for the epic finale.Turkey had been here before at this tournament. One-nil down at half-time against Switzerland in their previous Group A tie, they rallied after bold attacking substitutions and, in the wake of Semih Senturk’s equaliser, Turan scored the priceless late winner.History repeated itself in scarcely credible fashion here. As the rain came down the Czechs found themselves braced for a siege. Servet Cetin found himself unmarked with the goal gaping yet he could not direct his header.The atmosphere inside the stadium had reached fever pitch. The Czechs, having bounced to a delirious beat, were living on their nerves and the Turkish fans, massed behind the goal that their team was attacking, implored even greater effort.It came, although the equaliser was laced with good fortune. Altintop bent over yet another cross from the right and Cech left his line to collect with characteristic authority. Except that this time the slippery ball got away from him. The full horror of his fumble dawned as Nihat swept the ball into the empty net. Having lost the Champions League final with Chelsea on penalties to Manchester United, last night represented another savage cut for the popular goalkeeper.The tie appeared to be headed for penalties. The two teams had entered the game level on points and goals and in the event of a draw the 12-yard lottery was slated to separate them. Never has a group tie at a major championship been settled in such fashion but Nihat ensured that it would not be necessary. The Turkish support was still trying to digest the equaliser when Altintop played an incisive ball, the Czech defence stepped up too late and there was Nihat, almost in slow motion before them, curling a devastating finish up and over Cech, down off the crossbar and into the net. Cue bedlam. The substitutes raced off the Turkish bench to stage an impromptu pitch invasion; Terim and Nihat were snapshots in ecstasy.There was still time for a last-ditch Czech raid forward which was repelled and for Volkan Demirel, the Turkey goalkeeper, to get himself foolishly sent off for striking Koller. Tuncay Sanli finished the game between the posts and Turkey will miss Volkan against Croatia. The full-time whistle brought cheers that could have been felt in Istanbul.The Turkish players, so desperate to show their talents to a global audience and to justify the enormous expectations of their people, have repeatedly said that anything could happen if they reached the quarter-finals. They will struggle, though, to better this. Share via Email First published on Sun 15 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Turkey match reportscenter_img Share on Pinterest Czech Republic Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via Email Turkey players celebrate their amazing win over the Czech Republic. Photograph: Tony Marshall/PA Share on Twitter Shares00 Group A Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Friday Roundup

first_img Elevate Your FCPA Research There are several subject matter tags in this post. However, only subscribers to FCPA Professor’s premium search feature can see and use them in research. Efficient and cost-effective FCPA research is just a click away. Elevate Your Research Never mind that …, “foreign official” charges, scrutiny alert, ISO-37001 related, and ethics inquiry up north. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.Never Mind That …Never mind that Cobalt International – not once, but twice – beat back the government in connection with FCPA scrutiny in Angola (see prior posts here and here as well as this podcast).Nevertheless, a federal court judge recently approved an approximate $175 million settlement of investor class action claims alleging various securities laws violations by Cobalt related to its FCPA scrutiny (see here). As to the plaintiffs’ lawyers, well they get 25% of that amount plus approximately $2 million in reimbursement of litigation expenses.“Foreign Official” ChargesThis recent post highlighted the DOJ’s FCPA (and related) enforcement action against Frank James Lyon (the owner of Lyon Associates Inc. – a privately-held engineering and consulting company headquartered in Hawaii) in which he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to violate the FCPA (based on things of value provided to officials in the Federated States of Micronesia – FSM) as well as paying bribes to an agent of an organization receiving federal funds (based on things of value provided to officials with a Hawaii governmental agency – State Agency).Earlier this week, the DOJ announced that Master Halbert, the alleged Micronesian official, was criminally charged with conspiracy to commit money laundering.Scrutiny AlertCaliburn Int’lIn 2011, Caliburn International Corp. acquired Sallyport Global Holdings, Inc. (“Sallyport”). Caliburn recently filed a registration statement to publicly offer securities and disclosed:“In October 2016, an individual purporting to work in the Iraqi Ministry of Defense alleged in an unsolicited telephone call to Sallyport that Afaq [Afaq Umm Qasr Marine Services Company (“Afaq”), Sallyport’s partner on several U.S. Air Force contracts at several bases in Iraq, including the Balad Air Base] using its share of net profits, promised to pay Iraqi government officials in exchange for those officials naming Sallyport as a provider of services at the Balad Air Base under the Balad Construction Contract and the Balad Base Support Contract awarded in 2014.In November 2016, Sallyport voluntarily disclosed to the US Department of Justice (“DOJ”) a potential violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and potentially other U.S. laws related to Sallyport’s relationship with Afaq. The USAF awarded Sallyport two such FMS contracts in early 2014 for work at Balad Air Base, Iraq. Afaq was also a subcontractor to the Company in separate subcontracts in Iraq unrelated to Balad.Sallyport has engaged outside counsel and has cooperated, and continues to cooperate, with the DOJ’s investigation, which also considers whether Sallyport’s former management knew, or should have known, of the alleged promise of payments by Afaq to Iraqi government officials. The former management that negotiated and reviewed the Afaq MOU denies any such knowledge. At this point, we are unable to determine the likely outcome of the investigation.”VitolReuter reports:“The FBI is investigating energy trading firm Vitol’s top two executives in the Americas in connection with a Brazil bribery case … […]Miguel “Mike” Loya, Vitol’s U.S. head, and Antonio Maarraoui, the company’s head for Latin American and the Caribbean, are under investigation by the U.S. law enforcement agency.”ISO 37001This recent FCPA Blog post is titled “Three Predictions for the Future of ISO 37001” and sets forth the predictions of accredited certifying bodies that are performing ISO 37001 anti-bribery management systems audits.This is too funny and strikes me as being similar to asking barbers to make predictions about the future and value of getting a haircut.Ethics InquiryThis recent post highlighted questions swirling in Canada concerning alleged interference by the Prime Minister’s office in connection with SNC-Lavalin’s long-standing scrutiny.As reported here:“Canada’s parliamentary ethics commissioner said … that he would look into allegations that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau improperly pressured his former attorney general to call off a criminal case against a major engineering company based in Montreal. The announcement, made in a letter to two members of Parliament, followed several days of allegations that Mr. Trudeau, or members of his staff, improperly tried to force a settlement of charges that the company, SNC-Lavalin, paid million of dollars in bribes to officials in Libya when the country was ruled by Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.”last_img read more

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The Quest Upstream

first_imgby, Jennifer Carson, PhD and Pat Sprigg, CEOTweetShare71ShareEmail71 SharesImagine a dementia-inclusive community; a place where each person’s uniqueness is valued, deep relationships flourish and differences are embraced. Imagine a dementia-inclusive community where each person’s perceptions and experience of the world, while often different than our own, are taken into account and honored. Imagine a dementia-inclusive community in which compassionate care partners work proactively to support well-being and uphold each person’s right to live in the least restrictive environment. This is the type of community Carol Woods Retirement Community is fostering on its campus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Carol Woods believes there is an alternative approach to segregated and locked memory care units. While Carol Woods has supported people living with dementia in an inclusive setting since opening its doors in 1979, community members will attest that such an approach is not always easy. In fact, it is full of complex challenges. But those at Carol Woods strongly believe that the benefits are well worth the effort.Resisting the growing segregated memory care trend, Carol Woods believes each community member has the right to live freely in the manner and place of their choosing. Community members of Carol Woods recently reaffirmed their values and deepened their commitment to inclusion through a new research initiative, The Quest Upstream: Carol Woods’ Journey to Support the Inclusion of People Living with Dementia and the Well-Being of All Community Members. With an intentional turn away from biomedical understandings, reactive interventions and discrete programs, Carol Woods recently launched a project that aims to take the care and support of persons living with dementia upstream – to a place where well-being is proactively nurtured and the right to live freely is protected and maintained. Core to this quest is the understanding that everyone within the circle of care needs to achieve a sense of well-being, and the belief that the distress a person living with dementia might express is not an inherent result of dementia (i.e., so-called “dementia behaviors”) but communication of an unmet need.Working in partnership with Dr. Jennifer Carson (research assistant professor, University of Nevada, Reno), and guided by participatory action research, The Quest Upstream has two aims:to better understand and document the organizational and community requirements of inclusive living, support and care for residents living with dementia; andto collaboratively explore and document additional ways to better support the inclusion of residents living with dementia and the well-being and of all community members.Our goal overall is to raise awareness, challenge traditional thinking and approaches to dementia care and support and offer an alternative that is more humane and life affirming. We invite you to follow our learnings from The Quest Upstream through our monthly blog posts here at ChangingAging. Our next post will describe the community action team guiding our collaborative exploration. We look forward to learning together.Related PostsFostering Our Collective Capacity to Work through Complex IssuesThere is a common tendency to address these challenges with simple or complicated solutions more befitting of the inanimate. We believe the best solutions, while ever-changing, will come from the community itself, and each community is different.Beyond Being Known: Being CelebratedResidents are well known at Carol Woods Retirement Community. But there is a difference between being well known and being celebrated. Residents, employee and family care partners of the Building 6 and 7 assisted living neighborhood at Carol Woods are striving toward the latter. Kay, a resident, explains: We want…Can We Stop Being “Dementia-Friendly”?I have been advocating that community planners switch to the terms “age-inclusive” and “dementia-inclusive,” as these terms raise the bar by requiring the inclusion of such people in all aspects of community life and planning, rather than simply creating a kind but misguided process of substituted judgment.TweetShare71ShareEmail71 SharesTags: community Dementia Inclusive relationshipslast_img read more

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Mood disturbances and depression linked to disrupted sleep routines finds study

first_imgThe authors of the study from Scotland, Ireland and Sweden have shown that disruptions in the circadian rhythms of people can lead to problems in mental health. Daniel Smith, professor of psychiatry at the University of Glasgow and lead author of the research explained that by 2050 almost two thirds of the population would be living in the cities where there is an evident disruption of the circadian rhythm. He called this a public health issue. “…How do we take account of our natural patterns of rest and activity and how do we design cities or jobs to protect people’s mental health?” he said.For this study the team of researchers looked at a large amount of data from the UK BioBank. They obtained health data and information on over 500,000 participants since 2006. The participants were aged between 37 and 73 years. For this study alone they filtered out information on 91,105 participants who were asked to wear wrist-based activity trackers for a week any time between 2013 and 2015. According to Smith, they measured 100 movement data points in three dimensions per second over the week. They recorded the activity of the individuals during the 10 active hours a day and compared it to the least active 5 hours a day. The result of this comparison was called the relative amplitude.Related StoriesMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsI’m a CPAP dropout: Why many lose sleep over apnea treatmentUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepSmith explained that this relative amplitude showed that regularity and changes in the routine of rest and activity. He said that those who are active during the day and sleep well at night are the ones with healthy profiles and they have higher scores in relative amplitude. Those with a disturbed sleep on the other hand, he explained, and are up at night have lower activity during the day and have a lower relative amplitude.Thereafter the team gave the participants questionnaires to complete. This looked at scores on loneliness, unhappiness, reaction time, depression, bipolar disease, anxiety and neuroticism etc. The final results were calculated on the basis of the relative amplitudes of the population. The participants were classified into five groups based on their relative amplitudes.The groups were found to be of nearly equal size. The team negated influences of other factors such as age, gender, season during which the test was taken, smoking status, socioeconomic status, past traumatic experiences from childhood etc. these could also have an influence on the mental health and thus had to be accounted for before any conclusions could be drawn, explain the researchers.Results revealed that people with low relative amplitudes had poorer mental health. Movement from one low relative amplitude group to a lower relative amplitude meant a 9 percent increase in loneliness they found. There was an increase of 6 percent and 11 percent in risk of depression and bipolar disorder respectively with lowering of relative amplitudes. As the amplitudes decreased reaction times also reduced and so did the measures of happiness and satisfaction with one’s health.According to Smith, these figures may appear small but are all significant. He added that the main sufferers were people with poor sleep hygiene. This meant those people who were up at their mobile phones at night or woke up for a snack or tea or a drink middle of the night. He added that day time activity also mattered a great deal. He called “morning fresh air” as important as a “good night’s sleep” for optimum mental health. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDMay 16 2018According to a new study, people who routinely had a disrupted night’s sleep had an altered 24 hour cycle were more at risk of getting mood disorders, depression, bipolar disease. They score low on happiness and feel more lonely say researchers. This study, explain researchers, is vital in understanding the balance between rest and activity. The study appeared in the latest issue of the journal Lancet Psychiatry. Image Credit: Supawadee56 / Shutterstockcenter_img Source:https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(18)30139-1/fulltextlast_img read more

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World MS Day

first_imgMultiple Sclerosis ResearchA wide range of clinical trials have been conducted with the aim of improving our understanding of MS and developing a cure. What is Multiple Sclerosis (MS)?Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disorder that damages the nerves in the brain and spinal cord, leading to problems with muscle movement, balance and vision. Multiple Sclerosis and Women’s HealthWomen with MS face several gender-specific complications as the condition affects hormones, menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. Multiple Sclerosis DiagnosisMultiple Sclerosis (MS) can be difficult to diagnose when a person has had just one “attack” of what appears to be MS symptoms. Other conditions share MS symptoms and a physician will need to rule those out first. Body Cooling For Wheelchair ComfortPeople with a Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) are unable to sweat because their body can no longer communicate with their brain. Corien Staels discusses a wheelchair which negates this problem, as it contains a cooling backrest. Multiple Sclerosis HistoryMultiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder which affects the brain and spinal cord. Records indicate that the condition has affected humans for hundreds of years.center_img May 30 2018 At-Home Physiotherapy Exercises for Multiple SclerosisExercise and physiotherapy can play a positive role in rehabilitation and improving the quality of life of patients with MS. Multiple Sclerosis TreatmentPThere is no cure for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Treatment aims at delaying disease progression and preventing symptom relapse. Multiple Sclerosis in ChildrenAccording to the latest estimates, around 9000 children in the United States have MS, and some studies report that 2-5% of MS patients start experiencing symptoms before age 18.last_img read more

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Growth hormone shows potential to completely transform treatment for stroke survivors

first_imgMay 30 2018Less fatigue and better recovery of cognitive abilities such as learning and memory. These may be the results of growth hormone treatment after a stroke, an experimental study of mice published in the journal Stroke suggests.”We hope that this work can pave the way for clinical studies involving the use of human growth hormone as treatment in the rehabilitation phase after a stroke,” says Jorgen Isgaard, professor of endocrinology at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Swden, who also serves as a professor at the University of Newcastle, Australia.Treatment and rehabilitation after a stroke is a challenge, both for the victims and those around them. Recovery often involves a long and difficult process to repair the speech function, memory, the ability to think and concentrate and more. Worry, anxiety and severe fatigue are also common among those who have survived a stroke.The current study is based on research conducted in collaboration between the universities of Gothenburg and Newcastle. The results show a link between growth hormone and improved cognition after a stroke as well as the possible mechanisms that may be responsible.Related StoriesNew promising approach repairs system of blood vessels following strokeCalling on global community to prevent dementia by preventing strokeHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeThe fact that growth hormone generally has positive effects on cognition after brain damage has been found in previous studies. On the other hand, this is the first time the effect of growth hormone is being tested after a stroke, and the results are regarded as being very positive.The mice in the study, all with induced strokes, were treated with either an infusion of growth hormone or with placebo for four weeks. In the last week of treatment, they were tested individually in separate cages with touch screens.The animals were exposed to visual symbols in different combinations in which a correct pressure with a paw on the screen gave a reward in the form of a sugar solution. The mice that received the growth hormone performed correctly in 8 out of 10 cases, compared with 6 out of 10 for the control group. After conclusion of the experiments, researchers also analyzed a number of growth factors and biomarkers in the injured area of the brain.”The most important new finding is that growth hormone improves cognition after a stroke compared with controls. If this finding holds true for humans, it can lead to a breakthrough in terms of treatment that facilitates rehabilitation and quality of life after a stroke,” says Jorgen Isgaard.Growth hormone was also found to promote plasticity in the brain. The treatment led to higher levels of markers that reflect, among other things, the formation of new blood vessels, repair of nerve damage and reduced loss of brain tissue compared to controls.Now researchers hope to secure more funding to begin clinical trials and examine whether growth hormone treatment can also be successful if some time has passed after the onset of a stroke.”This has the potential to completely transform the treatment of people who survive a stroke,” says Jorgen Isgaard.Source: https://sahlgrenska.gu.se/english/research/news-events/news-article//growth-hormone-may-provide-new-hope-for-stroke-survivors.cid1569918last_img read more

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DFG to honor two researchers with Ursula M Händel Animal Welfare Prize

first_imgJul 27 2018Prof. Dr. Ellen Fritsche, a toxicologist from the Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, and PD Dr. Dr. Hamid Reza Noori, a mathematician, physicist and medical scientist from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, are to be presented with the Ursula M. Händel Animal Welfare Prize by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation). The prize which is worth €50,000 each is being presented for the seventh time. It is awarded to researchers who improve animal welfare in research in line with the principles of the 3Rs: Replacement, Refinement and Reduction.The winners were chosen from among 16 nominees. So impressive were the candidates that the jury decided that this year’s prize should be shared. Fritsche is to be awarded the prize for the development of a test system for chemical effects, which has the potential to fully replace animal experiments currently required by law for toxicological testing. Noori is being recognized for his use of big data in neurobiology, which has the potential to significantly reduce the use of animal experimentation.”As a research funding organization, the DFG has a natural and fundamental interest in the consistent implementation and refinement of the 3Rs. The quality of research results is directly linked to the responsible treatment of research animals,” said DFG Vice President Prof. Dr. Katja Becker, who will present the Ursula M. Händel Animal Welfare Prize on 23 November 2018 in Berlin. The prize will be awarded in conjunction with the opening of the new research centre Charité 3R – Replace, Reduce and Refine, in the Lecture Hall Ruin of the Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité.In her research Prof. Dr. Ellen Fritsche uses neurospheres, organ-like cell cultures which can be used to test the toxicity of a substance to brain development. This cell culture method has the potential to replace animal experimentation and identify chemicals that cause damage during the development of the nervous system. Because the neurospheres are grown from human stem cells, the results of the neurotoxicity studies allow a more accurate assessment of the risks of chemical substances to humans than is possible with animal studies, where the results are not always fully transferable to humans. Fritsche and her working group intend to use the prize money to further develop their neurosphere models in partnership with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to enable reliable characterization of the effects of neurotoxic substances and recognition of the test system, as a replacement for the currently required animal experiments.Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsPD Dr. Hamid Reza Noori uses new approaches in mathematics, data mining and machine learning to evaluate the wealth of data published in recent decades from neurobiological research on rats. Through the complex analysis of existing data, Noori was able to identify the biochemical circuits in the rat brain which are essential to information processing – without conducting a single animal experiment. Noori is now making the data from what currently amounts to nearly 150,000 rats available in two open access databases, which researchers all over the world can use to address research questions relating to neuroanatomy and neuropharmacology. The databases will help scientists to answer research questions in silico – by analyzing existing data – or to plan new experiments more stringently. The use of big data in preclinical neuroscience offers considerable potential for animal welfare in research.The Ursula M. Händel Animal Welfare Prize goes back to the initiative of the founder of that name. A resident of Düsseldorf, Ursula M. Händel (1915-2011) championed many forms of animal welfare over several decades. For example, she founded the “Bonn Animal Welfare Legislation Working Group” whose work was incorporated into amendments to the German Animal Welfare Act. Dedicated to animal welfare in science and research, Händel provided the DFG with the financial backing for the animal welfare prize. The prize is awarded every two years. Source:http://www.dfg.delast_img read more

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Plundering a nuclear test ban treasuretrove

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) has spawned a globe-girdling network of 300 detector stations that sniff out radionuclides, listen for low-frequency sounds, and record tremors—all to discern whether countries are carrying out clandestine nuclear weapons tests. And the treaty has not yet even come into force; the United States remains a prominent holdout. But the CTBT’s $1 billion International Monitoring System is 90% complete and has scored notable successes. Among them: sizing up North Korea’s nuclear tests, plotting the spread of radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear accident, and tracking the spectacular Chelyabinsk meteorite as it broke up over Siberia in 2013.This global stethoscope is amassing a treasure-trove of data. Initially, the CTBT Organization (CTBTO), based in Vienna, didn’t share, but after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami—when the monitoring system could have given an early warning—things have loosened up. Now, timely data are sent to tsunami warning centers in 13 countries, as well as to civil aviation authorities and nuclear regulators.This glasnost is due in large part to Lassina Zerbo, director of CTBTO’s International Data Centre from 2004 to 2013 and, since then, the organization’s executive secretary. He’s helped open up CTBTO data to the wider scientific community, through a series of biennial conferences and the virtual Data Exploitation Centre. Zerbo spoke with Science on the eve of the 5th CTBT Science and Technology Conference. His comments have been edited for clarity and brevity. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Q: After the 2004 tsunami, how was wider use of CTBT data encouraged?A: [The tsunami] led to some flexibility over confidentiality of data from the International Monitoring System. We got into a series of science and technology conferences whereby we try to think out of the box, moving away from our everyday work on nuclear test monitoring to see what the outside scientific community could do with the technology that we use.Q: Where did that out-of-the-box thinking lead you?A: We’ve realized that not only can we [detect] explosives relevant to our search but [with infrasound] we were able to follow the trajectory of Concorde when it used to fly from London to Washington or New York. We can detect plane crashes, like the one between Burkina Faso and Mali last July. That was detected by one of our stations in [Ivory Coast]. People want to go beyond that. How can we get better? What can we do with it?I was in Burkina Faso last year and there was a local chief [who described] an explosion 150 meters from his house. Because he was from the opposition party, he was of the view that [the ruling party] sent a missile and it missed him and hit the house next to him. I was on holiday and I asked my office to check if we detected the signal [with infrasound] and then give me what type of signal it is. We found out that it was from mine explosives that someone was keeping in his own house. I went [to the chief] and I said there is no point going and rallying people to go and complain because there was nothing coming up there to your house. [This is] how people can search and work on the data that we gather.Fukushima was a great example. We have a global system, [researchers wanted to] use the data of CTBT to understand how widely spread were the emanations of isotopes from the Fukushima accident, in which country, at what level, and so forth. People can push that because that’s not part of our day-to-day work or mandate. The International Atomic Energy Agency is accessing our data for purposes that are within their scope but outside our scope. We have seismic data, [and they used it to find] the real epicenter compared to the nuclear power plant. The International Civil Aviation Organization uses our data to try and help aircraft not to go over volcanoes. There are many, many other examples of what people use it for.Q: Are academic scientists using your data? A: Absolutely. We now have 52 contracts [with institutions] and there are many more contracts that are yet to be signed. Now, we have individuals who are doing their own research who want to access our data.Q: Are any data sets out of bounds?A: No, I wouldn’t say so. The out-of-bounds will be basically on the timeliness of the data. If an explosion happened now, we first have to say whether it’s a manmade event or whether it’s an earthquake. That’s the first thing we do before we find the radionuclides. So if somebody had real-time access to our data, they could say to the media: “I have found that Burkina Faso has carried out a nuclear test explosion.” We have to be very careful about real-time data. The search for evidence of a nuclear test can take up to 2 months. Beyond that we’re safe.People don’t realize what our radionuclide stations can detect: If you take, let’s say, 0.1 grams of an isotope, evenly distributed around the globe, we are able to detect that. You see how crazy that is? It’s beyond what you can imagine.This is why I’m promoting opening up our data. Out in private industry, if people are asking you to give them what you have and then you don’t share, they will go and do the same thing, which will take them time, but they will go and do it and find it and make you irrelevant. The best way is to share your information with them and let them help you grow so that you remain relevant. People work with our data and improve the science and technology behind it; it helps us improve the processing as well as the sensitivity of our equipment. It’s basically the cheapest consultants that you can get. You’re not paying for it.last_img read more

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Atlantic weather bomb opens new window on Earths interior

first_imgEarthquakes aren’t the only things seismologists listen for. Over the past decade, they have honed their talent for detecting the seismic waves generated by severe storms, including the echoes of Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy. Ocean swells from these storms rattle around, creating waves that drum the ocean floor and move into the mantle. They can even be picked up by seismometers on the other side of the world. Until now, this circuitous weather tracking system has mostly been limited to high-speed P waves, which pass through rock with straight compressive force; S waves, with their distinctive perpendicular sashay, have remained elusive. In a new study published this week in Science, however, researchers tracked a 2014 North Atlantic “weather bomb”—a cold-weather cyclone seen here pummeling the United Kingdom—with a pattern of P and S waves, picked up by an array of 202 borehole seismometers in Chugoku district in Japan. The technique, if repeated for other storms, could give geologists a new tool for studying Earth’s deep structures.last_img read more

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Every year thousands of drowned wildebeest feed this African ecosystem

first_img It’s one of the iconic sights of Africa: hundreds of thousands of wildebeest thundering across the Serengeti in an annual mass migration. But when the animals come to the Mara River, the scene can turn deadly. Unable to scramble up steep banks, thousands drown in a mass panic or get picked off by crocodiles. It turns out, however, that what’s bad for the wildebeest is good for the ecosystem, say Amanda Subalusky and Emma Rosi, ecologists at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York.For the past 6 years, Subalusky and her husband, Christopher Dutton, also at the Cary Institute, have studied the scale and effects of this mass carnage. They have taken stock of the pileup of carcasses, surveyed the parade of scavengers assisting in their decomposition, and tracked where nutrients from the dead animals wind up in the food chain. “It’s a pulse of nutrients, but then you have a legacy of bones, which are acting as a slow release fertilizer” with multiple effects downstream, Subalusky says. “The sheer amount of organic matter that is made available is astonishing,” says deep-sea ecologist Paulo Y. G. Sumida at the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil, who studies the ecological role of whale carcasses. It “is likely to make a big difference for the whole trophic web and for animals as well.”The wildebeest migration is the world’s most massive animal movement: 1.2 million animals cross the savanna in an 1800-kilometer circuit between Kenya and Tanzania as they follow the rains. They consume more than 4500 tons of grass every day and deposit heaps of dung, transforming the landscapes they cross. “The migration affects every single process in this ecosystem,” says J. Grant Hopcraft, a landscape ecologist at the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom who has studied wildebeest for decades. But the impact on the Mara River had not been as closely assessed. By Elizabeth PennisiJun. 19, 2017 , 3:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Every year, thousands of drowned wildebeest feed this African ecosystem Email Credits: (Graphic) G. Grullón, C. Baek, and K. Sutliff/Science; (Data) A. Subalusky et al., PNAS (2017) Dividing the spoils Wildebeest carcasses and bones release carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus at different rates, fueling many kinds of plant, animal, and microbial growth locally and downstream. Subalusky, then a Yale University graduate student working with David Post, decided to take a closer look when she first saw the aftermath of the mass drownings: massive flocks of vultures and storks picking over the smelly carcasses. She checked the historical records and in 2011 began surveying the Mara River annually, measuring the carbon, phosphorus, and nitrogen content of carcasses; counting the numbers of scavengers; testing water quality; and capturing fish for chemical analyses of the sources of their nutrients.As Subalusky and her colleagues report in this week’s issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, about 6500 animals drown each year, dumping 10 blue whales’ worth of meat into the river. The fresh carcasses, which accumulate at bends and in the shallows, feed crocodiles and provide up to 50% of the diet of local fish. As they decay, they annually add about 13 tons of phosphorus, 25 tons of nitrogen, and 107 tons of carbon to the ecosystem in half a dozen pulses that each last about a month. During those weeks some nutrient levels can quadruple temporarily.  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The bones, which make up half the biomass, are the last to decay, taking 7 years. Along the way they support a film of microbes that in turn become food for fish and other river-dwellers.“I am stunned by the extent of the annual mass wildebeest drownings and their large contribution of [carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus] to the energy budget of the Mara River,” says Gary Lamberti, an aquatic ecologist at the University of Norte Dame in South Bend, Indiana. The boon likely extends beyond the river, as vultures and storks move wildebeest-derived nutrients tens of kilometers inland.The study, which was quite challenging and dangerous to do, adds to a growing body of evidence that mass mortality can have ecosystem impacts. Researchers like Sumida have found, for example, that dead whales provide a pulse of food to nutrient-starved ocean floors, enabling a specialized ecosystem to flourish on the decaying carcasses. Others have tracked how salmon that die after they finish their final upstream journey to spawn add nutrients to river ecosystems. The impact of the wildebeest appears to be larger, however; they contribute four times more biomass to the Mara than dying salmon add to British Columbia’s rivers, Subalusky notes.“These phenomena highlight the multiple pathways—nutrients, direct consumption, food web transfers—by which animal tissue can influence food webs,” Lamberti says.On a broader scale, “the [wildebeest] findings have implications for understanding the ecological role of past and present animal migrations,” says David Janetski, an aquatic ecologist at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The bison in North America, the saiga antelope in central Asia, and many caribou in the Arctic once migrated by the millions, sustaining ecosystems in the rivers they crossed. When the migrations dwindled, the organisms that relied on the carcasses of animals that came to grief may have declined or vanished, he says.On the positive side, the wildebeest drownings kill only about 0.7% of the total herd each year. Illegal harvesting, starvation, and predation kill many more. “Although drowning events are horrendous and graphic, they should not be our primary concern for the long-term sustainability of this population,” Hopcraft says. “If anything,” he says, “the Serengeti shows us what an ecosystem should look like.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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NSF requires institutions to report sexual harassment findings

first_img The National Science Foundation (NSF) in Alexandria, Virginia, announced today a new set of measures to combat sexual harassment by people working on the projects it funds. The steps may include suspending or eliminating research grants after an institution finds that a grantee committed harassment.NSF said it will require institutions to tell the agency when they make such a finding. They also must report placing grantees accused of harassment on administrative leave while an investigation is underway. NSF Director France Córdova said the agency may suspend a project’s funding in such cases. The policy allows the agency to take actions “as necessary to protect the safety of all grant personnel.”The move comes as research organizations continue to confront reports that sexual harassment is rampant within many scientific disciplines and too often is ignored by administrators. Córdova described today’s changes as an expansion of the agency’s previous steps to combat the problem, including a 2016 statement requiring NSF grantees to comply with the requirements of Title IX, the 1972 law that prohibits discrimination based on sex at universities that receive federal funding.“We’re doing this to show in a defined way that NSF doesn’t tolerate sexual harassment or any form of harassment at grantee institutions or field sites or anywhere science is done,” Córdova said during a press conference. People who commit harassment, she said, “really upset the whole balance of the scientific ecosystem and discourage scientists, particularly young scientists, from contributing.”Until now, although NSF oversaw institutions’ compliance with Title IX, the agency often had to rely on media reports to find out about sexual harassment cases involving its grantees, Córdova said. “That’s a pretty poor way to find out about something,” she acknowledges.NSF continues to expect its grantee institutions to take the lead in investigating sexual harassment complaints, and those investigations can take months to complete. The agency’s new policy does not require institutions to report an allegation before the investigation is complete, except when they place the accused on administrative leave. Córdova says NSF has previously suspended grants under such circumstances.The new policy announced today allows NSF, once an investigation is completed, to require institutions to remove people who committed harassment from funded projects.It also requires grantee institutions to establish “clear and unambiguous standards of behavior to ensure harassment-free workplaces,” including scientific conferences, and to set up “accessible and evident” methods for all personnel, including students, to report violations.Scientists who have worked on projects to stop harassment in science welcomed the new policy. “There’s nothing like tying grant dollars to ethical behavior,” said Meg Urry, a professor of astronomy and physics at Yale University who active in efforts to broaden the participation of women in her discipline and science. “That will be a tremendous incentive for people to get this right.”But the move also casts a dim light on the state of the science community, said Kate Sleeth, associate dean of administration and student development at City of Hope in Duarte, California, who as past chair of the board of directors for the National Postdoctoral Association ran a survey last year finding nearly 30% of postdocs had experienced sexual harassment. “It’s kind of sad that it will take a national organization to say ‘We will not fund you’ to stop this from happening,” she said. Nonetheless, she hopes the policy will act as a deterrent.NSF announced it set up a new webpage, NSF.gov/harassment, that lists its policies and procedures to stop harassment as well as best practices and frequently asked questions.The agency will solicit comments on these new grant terms and conditions through an announcement in the Federal Register within the next several weeks. NSF requires institutions to report sexual harassment findings Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Maggie KuoFeb. 8, 2018 , 10:00 AM The National Science Foundation announced new measures to combat sexual harassment.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country National Science Foundation Emaillast_img read more

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Labgrown patch of heart muscle and other cells could fix ailing hearts

first_img BURSAC LAB/DUKE UNIVERSITY Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a heart attack. Each time, up to a billion heart muscle cells suffocate. Those lost cells never regrow, leaving almost 800,000 people a year impaired for life—if they survive at all. Nenad Bursac believes he can patch some of those people up, literally.Over the past 20 years, the bioengineer from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has been developing a “patch” that could take the place of the cells destroyed by a heart attack. In rodents, he has found it can hook up to the circulatory system and contract. Bursac’s patch is now about the size of a poker chip and the thickness of cardboard—big and complex enough to be tested in large animals, he declared this month at the Experimental Biology 2019 meeting in Orlando, Florida.Like others attempting to repair damaged hearts, Bursac starts with stem cells, which can develop into specialized tissues such as heart muscle. But whereas some researchers inject hundreds of millions of individual heart muscle cells into the body, Bursac’s team and several other groups grow full-fledged pieces of heart muscle in a dish, which surgeons could attach to a damaged heart. “This could be a transformative approach,” says Ralph Marcucio, a developmental biologist at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. Bursac’s research effort “is the best in the field,” adds Martine Dunnwald, a cell biologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. A patch of lab-grown human heart tissue (left) has holes near its edges to make it easier to attach to a damaged heart. A magnified look at one implanted on a mouse heart shows the patch’s capillaries (red) nourishing its muscle cells (green). Email By Elizabeth PennisiApr. 24, 2019 , 4:30 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country At one point, cardiologists thought the heart had a secret stash of stem cells that could be stimulated to repair the organ naturally, but now most biologists agree such cells don’t exist in the heart. An alternative in early clinical trials is to make heart muscle cells in a lab dish from other stem cells, inject them into the artery supplying the heart, and hope they settle in the organ and compensate for any dead tissue.Bursac is skeptical of that approach, because the percentage of cells that survive injection and make it to the heart is very small. His approach requires open-heart surgery, but it delivers a repair that more closely matches the cell types and architecture of the real organ. “What people are now seeing is you need more structure and more cells,” says Jeffrey Jacot, a bioengineer at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.Bursac started to work on heart patches as a Ph.D. student, coaxing neonatal rat cells to transform into heart muscle in a dish and contract—a first for mammals. Other researchers developed tiny heart tissue swatches for testing drugs in lab dishes. But Bursac wants to fix hearts directly. Over the years, his team has learned the best scaffolds for culturing stem cells are made of fibrin, a protein that helps form blood clots, and the best way to nurture these scaffolded cells is to gently rock them inside a suspended frame that allows the growing patch to swish back and forth in liquid media. “These cells mature and become strongly contracting,” Bursac says.In 2016, when his lab figured out how to produce those powerful contractions, the heart patches were tiny. Then, 2 years ago, the team grew a 4-centimeter-by-4-centimeter patch—potentially big enough to repair a damaged human heart.”The size is exciting,” says Christopher Chen, a bioengineer at Boston University. It “suggests that you can get to a scale that is clinically relevant.”Bursac’s team also showed in rodents that blood vessels from the heart being treated can expand into the patch to keep it alive. Bursac has recently woven in more complexity, adding populations of endothelial cells, which develop into blood vessels, and fibroblast cells, which he realized can help the patch form and become stronger. A patch composed of 70% heart muscle cells, with the other two kinds of cells making up the rest, appears best so far, he reported at the meeting.When the patch is implanted in rats and mice, its capillary network hooks up with the rodent’s circulatory system, he reported. “But we still don’t know if this can provide a survival advantage to the patch.”Nor is it clear how—or even whether—a patch will become electrically and mechanically integrated with the original heart so they function as a true unit. Because the patch would be stitched to the outside of a damaged heart, over the scar tissue, “it is difficult to have [it] beat coordinately with existing muscle,” points out Katherine Yutzey, a cardiac biologist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio.Answers may come from tests of these human heart patches in pigs or other large animals, which Bursac is conducting with bioengineer Jianyi Zhang at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. But Michelle Tallquist, a cardiovascular biologist at the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine in Honolulu, worries that producing a patch for someone who has just suffered a heart attack could take too long—as much as 6 months if the patient’s own cells were used as the starting point.Bursac thinks the answer could be to develop a bank of immunologically matched stem cells, which might be coaxed as needed into a heart patch in as few as 3 weeks. For him, the prize is clear. The patch can “replace dead heart cells with cells that are alive and beat and contract,” he explains. “You can see now that this could potentially go to therapy.” Lab-grown patch of heart muscle and other cells could fix ailing hearts Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Cockroaches may soon be unstoppable—thanks to fastevolving insecticide resistance

first_img The day that squeamish humans—and exterminators—have long feared may have come at last: Cockroaches are becoming invincible. Or at least German cockroaches (Blattella germanica) are, according to a new study. Researchers have found that these creatures, which have long been a prevalent urban pest, are becoming increasingly resistant to almost every kind of chemical insecticide.Not all insecticides are created equal. Some degrade the nervous system, whereas others attack the exoskeleton; they also have to be left out for varying amounts of time. But many insects, including cockroaches, have evolved resistance to at least one of the most commonly-used insecticides. And because cockroaches live only for about 100 days, that resistance can evolve quickly, with genes from the most resistant cockroaches being passed to the next generation.To test resistance in German cockroaches, researchers treated three different colonies in multiple apartment buildings in Indiana and Illinois over the course of 6 months. The populations were tested for their level of resistance to three different insecticides: abamectin, boric acid, and thiamethoxam. One treatment used all three pesticides, one after another, for 3 months before repeating the cycle. In another treatment, researchers used a mixture of insecticides over the full 6 months. A final treatment scenario used just one chemical that the selected roach population had a low resistance to for the entire time. By Kelly MayesJun. 28, 2019 , 11:55 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Regardless of the different treatments, the size of most of the cockroach populations didn’t drop over time, the researchers wrote last month in Scientific Reports. That was true even when the researchers used multiple insecticides at once—a standard practice among exterminators. That suggests cockroaches are quickly evolving resistance to all three of the chemicals that were tested. On the upside, the researchers found that one kind of treatment—abamectin gel bait—could wipe out a portion of the colony—if the roaches had a low-level resistance.Just how the cockroaches are evolving is unclear without further genetic testing. But if the findings hold, this widespread resistance could make it impossible to treat cockroach infestations with chemical insecticides alone. Instead, the researchers say, people will have to use what’s known as “integrated pest management,” which involves setting traps, cleaning debris off surfaces, and even vacuuming up the tiny suckers, in addition to chemical treatments. Talk about a nightmare—at least for the roaches. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Cockroaches may soon be unstoppable—thanks to fast-evolving insecticide resistance Email Volker Steger/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

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Late at night the shout that saved family in Chiplun Dam has

first_img“We have lived with them for generations. Fate wiped out these families from their roots. I don’t know whether to feel lucky that my family survived or mourn the death of people who were like my own,” says Gaikwad.That was not all. “We also saw that our rice crop on the one-acre farm next to the house had been washed away,” he says.mumbai rains, mumbai rains today, Ratnagiri dam, Ratnagiri dam water level, mumbai rains today live update, mumbai weather, mumbai rains live, mumbai rains forecast, mumbai rains forecast today, mumbai weather, mumbai weather today, mumbai weather forecast, mumbai weather forecast today, mumbai forecast A policeman at the site of the dam breach in Ratnagiri on Thursday. (Express photo by Arul Horizon)In Bhendewadi, the deluge washed away 12 of the 17 houses, and a temple — the remaining houses, including that of Gaikwad, suffered heavy damages. The residents are now being sheltered in a school, a few kilometres away.The dam, which is located off the Karad-Chiplun road and had undergone temporary repairs recently, started overflowing Tuesday evening following heavy rain. Also read | Government negligence led to breach of Tiware dam: NCPAround 9.30 pm, a part of the wall developed a breach. Soon, a large portion was completely demolished by the water, which surrounded at least six villages or hamlets with a population of around 3,000 further downstream, cutting them off.According to officials, search operations are still on to locate the missing. At the school, meanwhile, Ajit Chavan, who lost his parents and brother, is struggling to voice his grief. “Ranjit (his brother) went to take the bike and never came back,” he says.mumbai rains, mumbai rains today, Ratnagiri dam, Ratnagiri dam water level, mumbai rains today live update, mumbai weather, mumbai rains live, mumbai rains forecast, mumbai rains forecast today, mumbai weather, mumbai weather today, mumbai weather forecast, mumbai weather forecast today, mumbai forecast NDRF personnel and local trekkers search for people washed away after the Tiware dam in Chiplun breached following heavy rain in Ratnagiri, Maharashtra. (Express photo: Arul Horizon)On Thursday, as one of the seven bodies found was brought for autopsy at the sub-district hospital at Kamathe near Chiplun, the people waiting outside gathered around. Within minutes, a man identified it as that of his younger brother and broke down. More Explained “It is difficult to see people waiting for news of their loved ones and breaking down as the bodies arrive. I can’t imagine what they might be going through,” says Abaji Shinde, who is from a neighbouring village and has volunteered to assist in rescue operations.“I think the tough conditions here have made these people resilient, but I hope they have the strength to cope with such great losses,” he says. Advertising Written by Sushant Kulkarni | Chiplun (maharashtra) | Updated: July 5, 2019 7:11:31 am Best Of Express Scanty rains in Mumbai for rest of the week: IMD Taking stock of monsoon rain Mumbai: Heavy rain in first 10 days of July puts city close to monthly average of 840.7 mm Advertising Scant rain in Mumbai over next 48 hours: IMD LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach 0 Comment(s) Late at night, the shout that saved family in Chiplun: Dam has breached, dam has breached Narayan Gaikwad, 62, outside his damaged house in Chiplun, Ratnagiri district, Thursday. (Express photo: Arul Horizon)“Dharan futala, dharan futala (The dam has breached, the dam has breached).” Narayan Gaikwad and his family were having dinner Tuesday night when they heard the warning that changed their lives. “I ran to the cattle shed and cut the ropes holding the cows. Then, we ran up the slope behind the house. We stayed up there the whole night in the rain,” he says. Related News With the death toll in the floods caused by a breach in the Tiware dam in Ratnagiri’s Chiplun taluk rising to 18, and five people still missing, 62-year-old Gaikwad, his wife, son and grandson were among the lucky ones — they survived.Read | Ratnagiri Dam breach toll 18, questions raised about possible negligenceBut then, tragedy had struck next door in the Bhendewadi hamlet of Tiware village, barely 100 metres from the dam wall. “Our family was one of the few that survived because our house was on the edge of the flow. When we came back early in the morning, we saw that the houses of our neighbours, the Chavan families, were not there,” he says. Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan last_img read more

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Mumbai building collapse PM Modi expresses anguish over loss of lives

first_img Prime minister Narendra Modi, Mumbai building collapse, PM on Mumbai building collapse, Mumbai building collapse National Disaster Response force, PM expresses anguish, Mumbai news, Indian express news Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (File Photo)Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday expressed anguish over the loss of lives in a building collapse incident in Mumbai. Related News By PTI |New Delhi | Updated: July 16, 2019 7:28:14 pm Advertising ‘Kulbhushan Jadhav will get justice’: PM Modi after ICJ verdict Collapse of a building in Mumbai’s Dongri is anguishing. My condolences to the families of those who lost their lives. I hope the injured recover soon. Maharashtra Government, NDRF and local authorities are working on rescue operations & assisting those in need: PM @narendramodi— PMO India (@PMOIndia) July 16, 2019“Collapse of a building in Mumbai’s Dongri is anguishing. My condolences to the families of those who lost their lives. I hope the injured recover soon. “Maharashtra government, NDRF and local authorities are working on rescue operations & assisting those in need,” the Prime Minister’s Office tweeted quoting Modi.At least four persons were killed after a four-storey residential building collapsed in south Mumbai’s congested Dongri area Tuesday, trapping over 40 people under the debris, civic officials said there.center_img Kulbhushan Jadhav ICJ Verdict: Govt, Oppn hail ruling; PM Modi says truth prevailed He said the state government and the National Disaster Response Force are working on rescue operations. PM Narendra Modi pulls up ministers for being absent in House Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Gadget Ogling Show and Tell Fidget Folly and Connected Nightlights

first_imgVisual Echoes Welcome to the latest edition of Gadget Dreams and Nightmares, the column that’s finally recovered from the North American national holiday cookouts to pore over gadget announcements of note.In our fireworks spectacular this time around are an Amazon Echo speaker with a screen, a Bluetooth fidget spinner, and a nightlight that alerts you to notifications.As always, these are not reviews (thanks for still not bringing Echo to Canada, Amazon!). The ratings are indicative only of how much I’d like to try each item. Assuming, of course, that Amazon ever brings more of its products to the Great White North. I do like that there’s a proximity sensor, so it can flick on if you stumble out of bed at 3 a.m. desperate for a snack and don’t want to crash into the armoire in the dark. And connecting it to a smart smoke detector might give the hard of hearing an immediate warning that something is wrong.I don’t think it’s for me — there are legitimate use cases for this that stretch beyond the gimmicky, but I just can’t quite get past the marketing of it as a nightlight, for some reason.Rating: 3 out of 5 Blinks I’m a positive, welcoming person for the most part. I firmly believe in the mantra of “each to their own,” as long as it doesn’t involve harming anyone else. However, I will deliver a strong judgment against anyone I see using a Bluetooth-connected fidget spinner.The BlueSpin Bluetooth Spinner links to an app that tracks challenges, shares scores, and lets users chat with their pals about their cool new toy. Finicky Fidgeting Aumi, Oh Mycenter_img First, this belongs firmly in the realm of connected devices that in no way need to be connected. Second, it’s a crowdfunding project expecting to ship in September. That means that this tech-minded take on the latest fad may not land until months after the craze has had its moment.It’s easy to see fidget spinners proving more of a Pokemon Go than a yo-yo in the enduring, widespread-popularity stakes, so this is one idea that’s on the skids before it even makes it to the shelves.Rating: 3 out of 5 Spun Outs I’m cheating. The Amazon Echo Show (pictured above) was announced in early May, but with one column between then and now, and new Apple products to consider, there was just no space last time around. The Show has just been released, though, meaning it’s worth casting an eye over even now.This is the first in Amazon’s line of Echo smart speakers to incorporate a screen, and it seems very much more “speaker with a display” than “tablet with better audio and microphones.”It has all the functionality of Echo, including access to Alexa, Amazon’s voice-operated assistant. The screen can, for example, provide a more detailed weather outlook than what Alexa spouts out, and it can keep you more on track when you’re working through a recipe by displaying each step as you need it.It can display song lyrics too, which can help you avoid an embarrassing moment of forgetfulness during a sing-along at your next house party. The 7-inch screen does not have touch control, so you’ll have to bark orders at Alexa.I am very glad there’s support for video, namely Amazon Prime and YouTube (but, disappointingly, no Netflix as yet). It can display video from connected cameras, which can prove especially helpful if you want to check who’s at your front door without creating unnecessary movement inside.There’s video calling through the Alexa app or Show-to-Show, along with a feature called Drop In, which could prove tricky on privacy grounds. The opt-in tool allows those to whom you have granted access to drop in on you, and immediately start a video call. With only 10 seconds to reject a call or make it audio-only, that could lead to some uncomfortable conversations with your nearest and dearest if you’re not prepared or miss the call prompt.It’s overall a positive addition to the Echo family. It might not be for everyone, and some might prefer to buy a decent tablet for the US$230 they’d fork out for Show. Still, for frequent Alexa users and those who might be too busy to tap on a screen, it could be worthwhile.Now, if only Amazon could make it available in my neck of the woods — and maybe add Netflix support.Rating: 4 out of 5 All For Shows. Aumi Mini is a smart notification light and nightlight. It has IFTTT support to allow for all manner of use cases.At first glance, I wanted to hate Aumi Mini. There’s something just intrinsically annoying about a flashing light every time your phone wants to bring your attention to something. On second thought, though, it’s far more useful. Kris Holt is a writer and editor based in Montreal. He has written for the Daily Dot, The Daily Beast, and PolicyMic, among others. He’s Scottish, so would prefer if no one used the word “soccer” in his company. You can connect with Kris on Google+.last_img read more

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Drug treatment at a young age could help reverse autismlike behavior in

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 10 2018New research on autism has found, in a mouse model, that drug treatment at a young age can reverse social impairments. But the same intervention was not effective at an older age.The study is the first to shed light on the crucial timing of therapy to improve social impairments in a condition associated with autism spectrum disorder. The paper, from Boston Children’s Hospital, the University of Texas, Harvard Medical School and Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children, was published today in Cell Reports.Tuberous sclerosis and autismMany of the hundreds of genes that likely regulate complex cognitive and neuropsychiatric behaviors in people with autism still remain a mystery. However, genetic disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex, or TSC, are providing clues. Patients often have mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, and about half develop autism spectrum disorder.The investigators, led by Peter Tsai, MD, PhD, at UT Southwestern Medical Center, used a mouse model in which the TSC1 gene is deleted in a region of the brain called the cerebellum.”There were several mouse models of TSC previously published, but they all had seizures and died early in life, making it difficult to study social cognition,” says Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, who directs the Translational Neuroscience Center and the Translational Research Program at Boston Children’s and was the study’s senior investigator. “That is one reason why we turned to knocking out the TSC1 gene only in cerebellar Purkinje cells, which have been implicated in autism. These mice have normal lifespans and do not develop seizures.”Timing is everythingThe new research fed off a previous study published in 2012. In that study, Sahin and colleagues treated the mutant mice starting in the first week of life with rapamycin, a drug approved by the FDA for brain tumors, kidney tumors and refractory epilepsy associated with TSC. They found that they could rescue both social deficits and repetitive behaviors.Related StoriesResearchers study link between childhood viral infections and cerebral autoimmune diseaseResearchers move closer to finding the root cause of MSMice study suggests potential treatment approach for MS in humansBut when a similar drug, everolimus, was tested in children with TSC, neurocognitive functioning and behavior didn’t significantly improve. Sahin and his colleagues wondered whether there was a specific developmental period during which treatment would be effective.The new mouse study delineates not only the timeframe for effective rapamycin treatment of certain autism-relevant behaviors, but also some of the cellular, electrophysiological and anatomic mechanisms for these sensitive periods.”We found that treatment initiated in young adulthood, at 6 weeks, rescued social behaviors, but not repetitive behaviors or cognitive inflexibility,” says Sahin.More importantly, neither the social deficits nor the repetitive behaviors responded when the treatment was started at 10 weeks.Using advanced imaging, the researchers went on to show that the rescue of social behaviors correlates with reversal of specific MRI-based structural changes, cellular pathology and Purkinje cell excitability. Meanwhile, motor learning rescue appeared independent of Purkinje cell survival or rescue of cellular excitability.A new clinical trial?Based on the mouse findings, Sahin is now seeking funds to test whether early treatment can improve a broad range of autistic-like behaviors in children with TSC. Specifically, he’ll explore whether treatment as early as 12 to 24 months can help prevent both social deficits and repetitive inflexible behaviors. He hopes to see better results than in the earlier clinical trial, which involved children ages 6 to 21.Past research indicates that different autism-related disorders may have different windows of treatment. For example, animal studies of Rett syndrome suggest that treatment can be effective relatively late in life and still improve neurological outcome. Source:https://vector.childrenshospital.org/2018/10/rapamycin-autism-tuberous-sclerosis/last_img read more

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